Mandatory vs Law – What’s the difference?

Mandatory vs Law - What's the difference?
As an adjective mandatory is obligatory; required or commanded by authority.
As a noun mandatory is (dated|rare) a person, organisation or state who receives a mandate; a mandatary.

As a proper noun law is or law can be , perhaps originally meaning someone who lives near a burial mound or law can be (judaism) the torah.

mandatory

English

Adjective

(en adjective)

  • Obligatory; required or commanded by authority.
  • Attendance at a school is usually mandatory .
  • * 1999 , Ian Stewart, Jack Cohen, Figments of Reality: The Evolution of the Curious Mind , page 276
  • This kind of immediate control structure we take to be characteristic of the tribe, and it leads to a rather rigid type of system in which ‘every action not mandatory is forbidden’.
  • Of, being or relating to a mandate.
  • Mandatory Palestine

    Synonyms

    * compulsory
    * obligatory

    Antonyms

    * (obligatory) optional
    * (obligatory) elective

    Derived terms

    * mandatoriness

    Noun

    (mandatories)

  • (dated, rare) A person, organisation or state who receives a mandate; a mandatary.
  • Anagrams

    *

    law

    English

    (wikipedia law)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) lawe, and gesetnes. More at (l).

    Noun

  • (lb) The body of rules and standards issued by a government, or to be applied by courts and similar authorities.
  • :
  • *, chapter=22
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp
    , passage=Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part.

  • A particular such rule.
  • :
  • *
  • *:As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish,I do not suppose that it matters much in reality whether laws are made by dukes or cornerboys, but I like, as far as possible, to associate with gentlemen in private life.
  • (lb) A written or understood rule that concerns behaviours and their consequences. Laws are usually associated with mores.
  • :
  • A well-established, observed physical characteristic or behavior of nature. The word is used to simply identify “what happens,” without implying any explanatory mechanism or causation. Compare to theory.
  • :
  • (lb) A statement that is true under specified conditions.
  • A category of English “common law” petitions that request monetary relief, as opposed to relief in forms other than a monetary judgment; compare to “equity”.
  • (lb) One of the official rules of cricket as codified by the MCC.
  • The police.
  • :
  • (lb) One of the two metaphysical forces of the world in some fantasy settings, as opposed to chaos.
  • An oath, as in the presence of a court. See wager of law.
  • Hyponyms

    * sharia law

    Derived terms

    * above the law
    * against the law
    * a law unto oneself
    *
    * Avogadro’s law
    * Beer-Lambert law
    * Boyle’s law
    * bylaw
    * canon law
    * Charles’ law
    * civil law
    * common law
    * contract law
    * corn laws
    * Coulomb’s law
    * criminal law
    * de Morgan’s laws
    * employment law
    * family law
    * Faraday’s laws
    * federal law
    * feudal law
    * Fourier’s law
    * Gauss’s law
    * Graham’s law
    * Gresham’s law
    * Henry’s law
    * Hooke’s law
    * Hubble’s law
    * international law
    * into law
    * Kepler’s laws of planetary motion
    * Kerchoff’s laws
    * law and order
    * lawful
    * lawgiver
    * lawlike
    * law lord
    * lawmaker, law-maker
    * law of cosines
    * law of large numbers
    * law of sines
    * law of small numbers
    * law of tangents
    * law of the land
    * law of the tongue
    * lay down the law
    * long arm of the law
    * lynch law
    * martial law
    * Moore’s law
    * Murphy’s law
    * natural law
    * Newton’s law of cooling
    * Newton’s law of gravitation
    * Newton’s laws of motion
    * Ohm’s law
    * physical law
    * power law
    * Poiseuille’s law
    * possession is nine points of the law
    * property law
    * Roman law
    * statuate (statute)+law=statuate law (US)
    * state law
    * statute law (Commonwealth English)
    * Stefan-Boltzmann law
    * Stokes’ law
    * sus law
    * take the law into one’s own hands
    * the law is an ass
    * three laws of robotics
    * unwritten law
    * Zipf’s law

    See also

    *
    *
    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . Also spelled low.

    Noun

    (en noun)

  • (obsolete) a tumulus of stones
  • a hill
  • * 1892 , Robert Louis Stevenson, Across the Plains
  • You might climb the Law […] and behold the face of many counties.

    Etymology 3

    Compare (la).

    Interjection

    (en interjection)

  • (dated) An exclamation of mild surprise; lawks.
  • References

    Etymology] in [[:w:da:ODS, ODS]

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

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