Hooped vs Hooned – What’s the difference?

Hooped vs Hooned - What's the difference?
As verbs the difference between hooped and hooned is that hooped is (hoop) while hooned is (hoon).

hooped

English

Verb

(head)

  • (hoop)

  • hoop

    English

    (wikipedia hoop )

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) hoop, hoope, from (etyl) ). More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun )

  • A circular band of metal used to bind a barrel.
  • A ring; a circular band; anything resembling a hoop.
  • the cheese hoop , or cylinder in which the curd is pressed in making cheese
  • (mostly, in plural) A circle, or combination of circles, of thin whalebone, metal, or other elastic material, used for expanding the skirts of ladies’ dresses; crinoline.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • stiff with hoops , and armed with ribs of whale
  • A quart pot; so called because originally bound with hoops, like a barrel. Also, a portion of the contents measured by the distance between the hoops.
  • (UK, obsolete) An old measure of capacity, variously estimated at from one to four pecks.
  • (Halliwell)
  • (plural) The game of basketball.
  • A hoop earring.
  • (Australia, metonym, informal, dated) A jockey; from a common pattern on the blouse”.“ hoop”, entry in 1989 , Joan Hughes, ”Australian Words and Their Origins , page 261.
  • Derived terms

    * hula hoop
    * jump through hoops

    Verb

    (en verb )

  • To bind or fasten using a hoop.
  • to hoop a barrel or puncheon
  • To clasp; to encircle; to surround.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun )

  • A shout; a whoop, as in whooping cough.
  • The hoopoe.
  • Verb

    (en verb )

  • (dated) To utter a loud cry, or a sound imitative of the word, by way of call or pursuit; to shout.
  • (dated) To whoop, as in whooping cough.
  • Derived terms

    * hooping cough
    (Webster 1913 )

    Anagrams

    *

    References


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    hooned

    English

    Verb

    (head)

  • (hoon)

  • hoon

    English

    Etymology 1

    Uncertain origin. Pimp sense from early 20th c.

    Noun

    (en noun )

  • (Australia, slang, dated) A pimp.
  • * 2010 , Adam Shand, The Skull: Informers, Hit Men and Australia’s Toughest Cop , page 86,
  • When the girls were sick, the hoons would beat the shit out of them and put them back on the street.
  • (Australia, slang) A lout.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) One who drives excessively quickly, loudly or irresponsibly; a street drag racer often driving heavily customized cars.
  • * 2009 , Victoria Police Home Page, State of Victoria,
  • Police have impounded an average of 10 cars a day since hoon laws were introduced by the State Government in June 2006.
  • * 2009 , Damien Broderick, Rory Barnes, I’m Dying Here , page 29,
  • The hoons piled out of the wreck brimming with righteous road rage, and were setlling to the task of beating the shit out of Wozza, Mutton and the hapless wheelman when they discovered the plastic bag.
    Derived terms

    *hoonish

    Verb

    (en verb )

  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) To drive excessively quickly, loudly or irresponsibly.
  • Etymology 2

    From Chinese.

    Noun

    (en noun )

  • (dated) A unit of weight, used to measure opium in British-controlled China.
  • * 1860 , James Aberigh Mackay, From London to Lucknow , Volume 2, page 553,
  • Their average consumption was six hoons‘. The greatest daily consumption by one man was fifteen ‘ hoons ; the smallest, two. The average number of years they had been addicted to the smoking of opium was seven years and some odd months.
  • * 2005 , Derek Mackay, Eastern Customs: The Customs Service in British Malaya and the Hunt for Opium , page 141,
  • The average smoker used only four hoons””’, leaving him 36 ””’hoons , nearly half an ounce, to sell on the black market.

    Anagrams

    *
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